Bio-Based Products

Area Coordinators: Carrie Eckert, Ganesh Sriram, Maciej Antoniewicz

Bio-Based Products:

Session: Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Production of Biofuels and Value-Added Chemicals

Session: Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering using –omics based approaches

Session: Engineering Microbes to Utilize Next Generation Feedstocks

Session: Synthetic Biology Tool Development and Metabolic Engineering in Novel Microbes

Session: Facility Enabled Opportunities in Bio-based Products 

Session: Synthesis in Space


Session: Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Production of Biofuels and Value-Added Chemicals

Session chairs:

Name: Zengyi Shao   

Affiliation: Iowa State University         

Email: zyshao@iastate.edu

 

Name: Andrew Garst

Affiliation: Musebio

Email: agarst@musebio.com

 

Session description:

Biosynthesis of fossil fuel substitutes and value-added chemicals represents an important engineering challenge that demands the invention of new technologies to achieve production strains that can be scaled-up to industrial fermentation. Such technologies include, but are not limited to i) design and control of metabolic pathways at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, ii) engineered molecular biosensors, iii) automated cloning and strain development technologies, iv) novel directed evolution strategies for improved enzyme and pathway performance, and v) improved strategies for overcoming problems related to scale-up. Papers describing novel strategies that enable or enhance production of highly valuable fuels and chemicals are particularly encouraged.  

 

Session: Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering using –omics based approaches

Session chairs:

Name: José L. Avalos

Affiliation: Princeton University

Email: javalos@princeton.edu

 

Name: Taek Soon Lee

Affiliation: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Email: tslee@lbl.gov

 

Session description:

Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering complement each other in the development of engineered cells with synthetic phenotypes, including cell factories for the production of desired biofuels and bio-based chemicals. The synergy between synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, together with the incorporation of systems biology, holds great promise to further advance the design and construction of engineered cells. The topics of this session center around the interrelationship between these disciplines, focusing on one hand on the application of –omics approaches (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) to the development of new technologies for synthetic biology or metabolic engineering in well-established as well as new host organisms; and on the other hand on the development of new synthetic biology tools to enable –omics approaches to address metabolic engineering challenges. The focus of this session will be on recent advances that are applicable across various biofuels and bio-based chemicals, various pathways and/or organisms.

 

Session: Engineering Microbes to Utilize Next Generation Feedstocks

Session chairs:

Name: Nanette Boyle

Affiliation: Colorado School of Mines

Email: nboyle@mines.edu

 

Name: Christopher Johnson

Affiliation: NREL

Email: christopher.johnson@nrel.gov

 

Session description:

To increase sustainability and economic feasibility of biological processes, production strains are being engineered to utilize non-traditional feedstocks. These feedstocks are abundant, inexpensive and can include (but are not limited to) lignocellulosic biomass, syngas, methane, methanol, glycerol, and carbon dioxide. Topics relevant to this session include the engineering of model organisms to take up and convert these compounds into substrates of central metabolism or even directly into the desired product OR engineering non-model organisms which are already capable of metabolizing these feedstocks.

 

Session: Synthetic Biology Tool Development and Metabolic Engineering in Novel Microbes

Session chairs:

Name: George Rudenko

Affiliation: Kiverdi

Email: george.rudenko@kiverdi.com

 

Name: Fuzhong Zhang

Affiliation: Washington University in St. Louis

Email: fzhang@seas.wustl.edu

 

Session description:

Biosynthesis of therapeutically and commercially valuable products relies on the development of efficient and robust cell factories.  Synthetic biology drives biomolecular and genomic engineering in microbes focusing on design and construction of biological systems.  Metabolic engineering aims at optimization of genetic and regulatory circuits for increased synthesis of specific products.  Applying these complimentary approaches could be beneficial in the development of well-studied model organisms to produce unique compounds beyond their natural abilities or to utilize unusual feedstocks.  Likewise, non-model organisms often prove to be superior platforms to produce biofuels and chemicals, owing to their unique metabolism, and naturally evolved features.  The advent of next generation sequencing, omics approaches, as well as genome remodeling tools such as CRISP/CAS9 and other enabling technologies has facilitated the exploration and harnessing of novel organisms for the production of value-added products.  This session focuses on various practical and computational approaches to explore microbial diversity and to engineer novel microbes including design, analysis and engineering of genetic circuits and whole-cell biocatalysts, and also welcomes research on model microbes used in novel and non-traditional ways.  We invite abstracts ranging from molecular and genetic tool development to global pathway engineering for both endogenous and novel products.  

 

Session: Facility Enabled Opportunities in Bio-based Products

Session chairs:

Name: Maciek Antoniewicz

Affiliation: University of Delaware

Email: mranton@udel.edu

 

Name: Yasuo Yoshikuni

Affiliation: LBNL

Email: yyoshikuni@lbl.gov

 

Session description:

This session will feature scientific studies related to bioproduction that have leveraged the expertise and resources of user facilities funded by the Department of Energy, including the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). We invite abstract that describe specific scientific discoveries made possible, as well as significant bioprocess improvements enabled, through the use of these and other specialized user facilities. Technology capability leads will also participate in a discussion panel to address questions from new potential applicants to these facilities.


Session: Synthesis in Space

Session chairs:

Name: Michael Roberts

Affiliation: Center for the Advancement of Science In Space, Inc.

Email: mroberts@iss-casis.org

 

Name: Jana Stoudemire

Affiliation: Center for the Advancement of Science In Space, Inc.

Email: jstoudemire@iss-casis.org

 

Name: Mark Blenner

Affiliation: Clemson University

Email: blenner@clemson.edu

 

Session description:

This session will provide a forum to learn more about access to the ISS National Lab for research in space to benefit Earth and the future role of biotechnology in low Earth orbit and deep space exploration.  The unique environment of microgravity is fueling innovation in diverse areas of discovery research and translational medicine ranging from macromolecular crystal growth for drug discovery/delivery; monoclonal antibody production; stem cell, organs-on-chips and vascularized tissue research for organ bioengineering; to the use of additive manufacturing platforms for material science and biological applications including biomanufacturing research focused on providing crew members the capability to use in situ and waste resources for life support needs. Synthesis in space is the next great opportunity for innovation in the limitless expanse of space. We invite talks from researchers conducting experiments on the space center on these and other relevant topics. The session will end with a panel discussion about the critical role biotechnology will play in NASA’s future missions, and how, as a community, we create synergy between earth and space biotechnology.