Biomolecular & Biophysical Processes

Area Coordinators: Jim Van Deventer and Jamie Moore

Biomolecular & Physical Processes:

Session: Protein Conjugates and Materials

Session: Protein Developability: Assessing Candidates for Preclinical and Clinical Studies

Session: Protein Engineering and Design

Session: Prediction and Characterization of Biophysical Properties

Session: Protein Structure and Function


Session: Protein Conjugates and Materials

Session chairs:

Name: Greg Thurber

Affiliation: University of Michigan

Email: gthurber@umich.edu

 

Name: Sreedhara Alavattam

Affiliation: Genentech

Email: alavattam.sreedhara@gene.com

 

Session description:

Effective chemical conjugation strategies are leading to the development of protein conjugates and materials with uses in areas ranging from therapeutics and diagnostics to bioenergy, industrial catalysis, and responsive materials. This session focuses on the discovery, synthesis, modeling, characterization, and application of these molecules, nanoparticles, and materials. Examples of structures of interest include, but are not limited to, protein-small molecule conjugates (e.g. antibody-drug conjugates), cyclized peptides, protein-polymer or protein-nanoparticle conjugates, and macroscopic materials that incorporate a protein component. Ongoing challenges in the development of these structures are the high throughput identification of promising conjugates and/or the elucidation of structure-function relationships enabling the de novo design of structures with desired properties. Preference will be given to abstracts describing original approaches for the identification of therapeutic or diagnostic leads, creative new approaches to the synthesis of well-defined conjugates, characterization of protein structure and function at the conjugate interface, or the compelling application of conjugates and materials in settings of health, materials or energy.

 

Session: Protein Developability: Assessing Candidates for Preclinical and Clinical Studies 

Session chairs: 

Name: Peter Tessier

Affiliation: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Email: tessier@rpi.edu

 

Name: Bryan Jones

Affiliation: Eli Lilly

Email: jones_bryan_edward@lilly.com

 

Session description:

This session will focus on advances in tools and methods to predict and characterize key properties that impact the development of therapeutic proteins and antibodies. It will include studies describing improved computational and experimental methodologies for understanding biochemical and biophysical properties such as solubility, aggregation, viscosity, and chemical and physical stability. Moreover, studies that use molecular engineering approaches to improve protein developability to address manufacturing and formulation challenges are also welcome. Studies relevant to this session include those focused on a wide range of therapeutic biomolecules, including peptides, proteins, antibodies, engineered binding domains, and multi-specific antibodies.

  

Session: Protein Engineering and Design

Session chairs:

Name: Justin Scheer

Affiliation: Boehringer-Ingelheim

Email: justin.scheer@boehringer-ingelheim.com

 

Name: Amy Karlsson

Affiliation: University of Maryland

Email: ajkarl@umd.edu

 

Session description:

Advances in protein engineering technology have created opportunities to improve biochemical and biophysical properties of proteins. This session will focus on advanced approaches that utilize computational and experimental methodologies to design proteins with improved function and stability for therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Topics include, but are not limited to, structure-aided protein design, library design, and screening strategies. Combining technologies to develop and advance new scaffolds and platforms will also be of interest.

  

Session: Prediction and Characterization of Biophysical Properties

Session chairs:

Name: Phanourios Tamamis

Affiliation: Texas A&M University

Email: tamamis@tamu.edu

 

Name: Sandeep Kumar

Affiliation: Pfizer

Email: Sandeep.Kumar@pfizer.com

 

Session description:

Proper understanding of protein properties necessitates development of appropriate analytical methods and characterization tools. This session will focus on new or improved technologies to characterize the biophysical properties of proteins, including but not limited to: folding, structure, aggregation, binding affinity and specificity, and stability. Abstracts describing experimental, computational, or robust empirical approaches to measure, predict, or design protein properties of interest are welcome. Studies that seek to connect ‘microscopic’ molecular properties computed from atomistic or coarse-grained molecular models with the ‘macroscopic’ biophysical measurements performed on macromolecular solutions are particularly encouraged.

  

Session: Protein Structure and Function

Session chairs:

Name: Hardeep Samra

Affiliation: MedImmune

Email: SamraH@medimmune.com

 

Name: Timothy Whitehead

Affiliation: Michigan State University

Email: taw@egr.msu.edu

 

Session description:

The physicochemical properties of biomolecules can greatly influence function as well as performance in the context of product development. For instance, conformational stability in solution, molecular patterns of structure, chemistry, viscosity, and phase behavior are tied to the success of a biotechnology product. This session seeks presentations focused on theoretical and/or experimental approaches for predicting and modifying properties relevant to controlling biomolecular and biophysical processes using both native and non-native protein modifications. Properties of interest include but are not limited to: conformational stability and structure, chemical stability, adsorption equilibrium and transport, molecular recognition, membrane filtration, viscosity, solubility, aggregation, immunological and therapeutic properties. Approaches may include but are not limited to sequence alignment, molecular modeling, early stage screening and characterization, non-natural amino acid incorporation, low volume measurements, and others that may be of general interest across biotechnology applications.